Snack

When it’s a family’s turn to bring in snacks for the class, sometimes the parents are confused about what to bring. We encourage whole foods: fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. It’s up to the individual family and the class—but more nutritious snacks give your kids a physical and intellectual edge. On average, a quarter of kids’ calories are come from unhealthy snacks. Snacks count! Help make snack time healthy at school and at home.
 
FRUIT
(Please wash and cut in to ready-to-eat pieces)
grapes (sliced for little kids)
apples
pears
clementines or oranges
bananas
dried fruit: raisins, apricots, cranberries etc.
usweetened applesauce
unsweetened canned fruit or fruit cups (in fruit juice, not syrup)
pineapple**
mangoes**
fruit salad**
melons:  cantaloupe, honeydew, watermelon berries or cherries*
(** for food safety, cut fruits need to be refrigerated if not consumed within one hour)

VEGETABLES
(Please wash and cut into ready-to-eat pieces)
baby carrots
sugar snap or snow peas
bell peppers
grape tomatoes
edamame (whole soybeans, cooked and cooled)
cucumbers
string beans
celery

 
WHOLE GRAINS
rice cakes
whole grain crackers
whole grain bread
whole wheat pita bread
whole grain dry cereal: (plain Cheerios, Joe O’s, Cascadian Farm Multi Grain Squares)
whole wheat saltines
 

OTHER FOODS
salsa, guacamole, hummus (as healthy dips for veggies, bread, or crackers)
olives (cutt if possible for little kids)
dried seaweed (nori)
wheat crackers
graham crackers
animal crackers
pretzels
plain baked chips, bagels
low-fat cheese sticks
low-fat yogurt
homemade bread or muffins
granola bars with less than 8 grams of sugar per 100 calories (Nature Valley Crunchy Granola Bars, Quaker 25% Less Sugar Chewy Granola Bars, Earth’s Best Organic Fruit Bars )
Seeds, Nuts, seed butter, nut butters, hummus — if appropriate for your child’s class (check with your teacher to find out if any children are allergic to these)